Apple Watch Series 4 Vs Apple Watch Series 3: A Wearable War

Content
  • 1. Design and Display
  • 2. Processor
  • 3. Performance
  • 4. Price
  • 5. Power and Battery
  • 5. Takeaway

If you want an Apple Watch, you probably have the Apple Watch 4 or Apple Watch 3 on your shortlist. Both are still offered by Apple and have a similar exterior.

However, there are some significant differences between them. We analysed Apple's two newest wearables across all the relevant factors to help you make the best choice so that you can see what's the same, what's different, and how much each will cost you.

Here is all the information you need to know about how the Apple Watch 4 and Apple Watch 3 compare, including everything from design and display to fitness, features, power, battery, and more.

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1. Design and Display

For a while, the original Apple Watch stayed in its original form, but the Apple Watch Series 4 brought about a shift. Let's examine the differences between these smartwatches. The Series 3 boasts a Force Touch OLED retina display that is 1,000 nits dazzling.

It is available in two finishes, Space Gray and Alloy, and two case sizes, 42mm or 38mm. They are each 11.4 mm thick.

 A 740mm2 display screen is available with the 42mm casing, while a 563mm2 screen is possible with the smaller case.

The Apple Watch Nike Series 3 is also available in a variety of colours and sizes.

On the other hand, the Apple Watch Series 4 provides a broader selection of finishes and has added Gold to its lineup.

In order to accommodate the substantially bigger screen sizes of 977mm2 and 759mm2, the casing was thinned down to 10.7mm while the case sizes were increased to 44mm and 40mm.

The Hermes version of the Series 4 also has a stainless steel finish.

The Series 4 has an LTPO display with 1,000 nits of brightness, although this might result in a 5–15% reduction in battery life.

In the end, the screen is considerably more functional and aesthetically appealing, with more room for messaging, tapping, and other activities you would want to perform on your wristwatch.

Between the Series 3 to Series 4, all Apple Watch bands are compatible.

2. Processor

The 64-bit dual-core S4 CPU, as would be expected from an Apple upgrade, has been added to the Series 4 to give it a more powerful processor.

The Series 4 will open applications more quickly and execute other tasks more quickly thanks to this processor, which Apple claims is up to two times quicker than the S3 processor found on the Series 3.

3. Performance

Apple claims that the 64-bit S4 processor in the Series 4 is twice as quick as the prior model. Theoretically, this should result in a somewhat speedier and smoother experience for you, but to be honest, I didn't really notice much of a change for the majority of everyday chores, such as activity monitoring and alerts. The software and user experience should otherwise be the same.

With the exception of the first Apple Watch, all Apple Watches have gotten the WatchOS 5 upgrade. A few new features were introduced with the update, including the option to stream your favourite podcasts, Siri shortcuts, automated workout detection, and a walkie-talkie app.

4. Price

If you want to purchase one of Apple's smartwatches, the Apple Watch Series 3 is the least expensive choice. The GPS-only model's starting price is about £279.

With a starting price of £399, the Apple Watch Series 4 GPS-only device is more costly by more than £100.

Series 3 and Series 4 start at £379 and £499, respectively, for the GPS and cellular variants, which represent even another improvement.

You must be willing to spend between £700 and $1,000 or more to purchase one of the Hermes versions.

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5. Power and Battery

There isn't much of a difference here because both the Apple Watch 4 and Apple Watch 3 run watchOS 5. However, because the Apple Watch 4 is a newer model, it will probably get software upgrades for a longer period of time.

Since the Apple Watch 4 features an Apple S4 chipset, which the company claims is up to twice as fast as the S3 in the Apple Watch 3, you should also experience greater power from it. Both watches can hold up to 16GB of data, however, the Apple Watch 3's Wi-Fi variant only has 8GB.

There isn't much of a difference here because both the Apple Watch 4 and Apple Watch 3 run watchOS 5. However, because the Apple Watch 4 is a newer model, it will probably get software upgrades for a longer period of time.

Since Apple Watch 4 features an Apple S4 chipset, which the company claims is up to twice as fast as the S3 in the Apple Watch 3, you should also experience greater power from it. Both watches can hold up to 16GB of data, however, the Apple Watch 3's Wi-Fi variant only has 8GB.

5. Takeaway

 Despite the fact that both of these smartwatches are excellent, the Apple Watch 4 has some definite improvements. The ECG capability, the updated chipset, and the larger screen stand out in particular.

However, it is also significantly more costly, so if those factors—as well as the countless smaller upgrades—aren't important to you, the Apple Watch 3 is a fantastic, less-priced alternative.

But the Apple Watch 4 is the obvious pick if you do care about those enhancements or simply want the greatest Apple Watch available.

If you're unfamiliar with Apple products or smartwatches in general, the Series 3 is unquestionably still current. This device will cost you less than £100 and contains a variety of functions that are ideal for a starting smartwatch.

However, choosing the Series 3 will mean passing up some significant new features and designs if you want the newest technology.

While many of the functions do not change, the Series 4 has some very great improvements, such as a greatly enhanced CPU, a new look, and health and fitness capabilities. In the end, it is quicker, wiser, and shinier.

A Series 4 will be a wise choice for those looking to upgrade from a Series.

Read more: Apple Watch Series 7 Vs. Apple Watch Series 6

Read more: Apple Watch 6 Vs Apple Watch 5

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Content
  • 1. Design and Display
  • 2. Processor
  • 3. Performance
  • 4. Price
  • 5. Power and Battery
  • 5. Takeaway